GOVERNMENT TO BE FIRM ON SCHOOL MANAGERS WHO FAIL TO PROTECT LEARNERS UNDER THEIR CARE

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

(Issued under Article 35 (3) of the Constitution)

Ministry of education

Bullying in schools

NAIROBI March 8, 2017

The Cabinet Secretary for Education, Dr. Fred Matiang’i has the government will be firm on school managers who will fail to protect learners under their care from bullying and other forms of mistreatment.

“We will confront the issue with a measure of ruthlessness,” Dr. Matiang’i said.

Dr. Matiang’i said head teachers must take responsibility for what is happening in their school.

Saying that regulations required that the regulations required  that head teachers sleep in schools noting that nothing replaces the presence of school heads on the school.

He was speaking a conference for the Catholic Educational Institutions Head teachers and Directors Conference, Catholic University of Eastern Africa (CUEA) today. He was flanked Chairman, Commission for Education and Religious Education Father Maurice M. Makumba,   and Vice Chancellor of CUEA, Prof. Justus Mbae.

Dr. Matiang’i also expressed concern that some schools carried out weekend tuition when regulations required that they provide tuition between 8.00am and 5.00pm.

He said schools unduly overburdened learners, saying weekend tuition was unthinkable.

“The saddest thing about this is that teacher’s studied educational psychology during their training,” Dr. Matiang’i said adding that children should be left to go to church and spend their time with families over the weekends.

The CS said he had advised Vice Chancellors of Public Universities not to pay salaries to lecturers on strike, saying the advice was grounded in the laws of the country.

“Why do you want to make money when you have not worked?” Dr. Matiang’i posed.

Father Maurice M. Makumba praised the Ministry of Education for the manner it had administered 2016 KCPE and KCSE examinations.

He asked the government to extent quality assurance and standards services to private schools, saying they also needed quality delivery of the curriculum just like their public schools counterparts.